Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Thich Nhat Hanh’

Thich Nhat Hanh Quote Collective's photo.

“In a family, if there is one person who practices mindfulness, the entire family will be more mindful. Because of the presence of one member who lives in mindfulness, the entire family is reminded to live in mindfulness. If in one class, one student lives in mindfulness, the entire class is influenced.”

Source ~ Thich Nhat Hanh Quote Collective

 

Read Full Post »

Here is the wanted list! The books are in no particular order: some were more relevant than others. The teachers I go back to and read frequently are Bhante Gunaratana and Thich Nhat Hanh. The Dalai Lama’s words are always wise. Sharon Salzberg and Joseph Goldstein also provided valuable insights. Tibetan Buddhist practices are much closer to yoga meditations from the tantras, that we have practiced over all these years, than they are to insight meditations and loving kindness meditations. I created a synthesis of various practices for June meditations.
No Mud No Lotus: The Art of Transforming Suffering by Thich Nhat Hanh
Peace is Every Step by Thich Nhat Hanh
Real Happiness by Sharon Salzberg
Insight Meditation by Sharon Salzberg and Joseph Goldstein
Mindfulness in Plain English by Bhante Gunaratana
Beyond Mindfulness in Plain Engish by Bhante Gunaratana
Meditation on Perception by Bhante Gunaratana
The Art of Happiness by The Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler MD
The Art of Happiness in a Troubled World by The Dalai Lama
The Wisdom of Insecurity by Alan Watts
(The behavioral economist and best seller Dan Ariely provides quantitative insight. Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal was also an important medical voice carrying more weight for many readers.)

Read Full Post »

Walking Meditation

Meditation does not have to be complicated. The Vietnamese Buddhist master Thich Nhat Hanh is characteristically simple, insightful, and to-the-point in Walking Meditation. If sitting still in one place is challenging, try walking meditation.  There are five progressive guided meditations on the CD.

The book tells the reader upfront what meditation can do:

To meditate is to learn to stop–to stop being carried away by our regrets about the past, our anger or despair in the present, or our worries about the future. By practicing the art of stopping, we can enter the present moment and be nourished by beauty and wonder of life in and around us: the smell of flowers, the warmth of sunshine, the color of the sky. To practice mindfulness is to begin to realize that we have a choice–to stop and rest, or run, to be angry or happy. Once we choose to stop, everything will be OK.

For a recently uploaded full review, visit http://www.mahasriyoga.com/bookreviews/WalkingMeditation.html.

Read Full Post »